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Instant Banner Pilot

Originally Posted October 2009 on Tumblr

Drove about 11 hours yesterday and stopped at a Super 8. The lobby was probably the worst smelling room I’ve been inside in at least six years or so. It smelled like used floss mixed with low-grade anti-bug spray. I was reluctant but it was already pretty late. Luckily the actual room smelled ok.

We stayed up and sorted merch. Danny tried to make cheddar cheese ramen using hot water from the coffee maker but it didn’t work that well and then he realized we had no utensils. After debating the merits of using a key or a sharpie pen to eat ramen with, he just drank it instead. “This is disgusting,” he said. “You guys do not want to be eating what I’m eating right now.”

While sorting the merch, we discovered a blank white t-shirt. Inspired, I used the rejected-as-a-utensil sharpie to make a Ramen noodle-themed Banner Pilot t-shirt. I can’t remember now but I think it has the little smiley face guy and says “Instant Banner Pilot: Chicken Flavored” and, unlike most shirts, advertises that it has no trans fat.

Only one in existence! If you want to buy it, ask one of us at a show and we’ll grab it from the van.

On the highway in Ohio right now; New York is next.

-Nate

We Have a Winner!

Originally Posted 10/15/09 on Myspace

Last month we announced our Six Words contest which promised all sorts of goodies and had one simple rule:

“Tell us in six words, no more no less, why you should win this contest”

We had over 130 entries as people tried to use the six word limitation to their advantage and come up with something clever. And we now have a winner! Contestant Justin will get a free CD, free vinyl record, free book, and free t-shirt due to his winning entry:

“would love to hear it!”

The thing Justin understood, that all the losers did not, is that Banner Pilot is all about breakin’ the rules*

So congratulations, Justin!

-Nate

*note: please follow the rules in all future contests

Regional CD Release Shows!

Originally Posted 8/19/09 on Myspace

Current mood:luminous (awesome Myspace emoticon unavailable)

So, we’ve got a new album coming out on September 1st and we decided to do a record release show for it. But then we thought “You know, it’s kind of lame for bands to do their release show in just one city…. all the kids in other cities miss out.”

Luckily, we came up with a great solution: Regional Release Shows! Now that there’s multiple options you can drive to the town nearest you and enjoy a sweet release show. Here’s the details:

The Western third of the country should attend the Minneapolis show on September 4th at the 7th Street Entry. The Framed, Amen and the Hell Yeahs and The Dirty Hits will also be playing

The Eastern third of the country can check out the Chicago show on September 5th at Ronny’s. Brickfight, Arms Aloft and Everything is Ruined will be there too

And for those of you in the middle of the country, we’ve got you covered on September 6th in Elgin, IL at the Gasthaus. More bands TBA

Convenient for everyone. See ya at the show!

-Nate

 

Collapser Contest!

Originally Posted 8/10/09 on Myspace

Current mood:sneezy (awesome Myspace emoticon not available)

Since our new album Collapser comes out on September 1st, we thought it would be cool to run a contest in which one lucky winner will win a free copy and some other stuff. Our accountant told us this was a terrible idea, but we said “We’re not paying you to be a buzzkill, man.”

So here’s the contest: you tell us in exactly six words — no more, no less — why you should win the contest. If we pick your entry, you win! There’s no real criteria beyond the word length; we might pick one because it’s funny, or well-written, or because it makes the most compelling case.

To participate, just add a comment to this blog with your entry. If you win, we’ll shoot you a message to get your address and stuff. If you’re a a total dork and don’t have a Myspace account, you can instead email us with “Contest” as the subject line.

If you win, you get the following goodies:

Collapser – CD or colored vinyl, your choice

Resignation Day – CD or colored vinyl, your choice

You Idiot (my book)

A t-shirt of your choice. You can look on the myspace page and pick your design and size, but this is the one item where we might have to make you pick an alternate if we’re out of a particular combo.

Now, don’t be a jerk and say something like “So I can forget my leprosy” unless you actually have leprosy.

Alright! Tell us in six words, no more no less, why you should win this contest. Contest ends Sunday August 30th.

-Nate

Our New Album is Done!

Originally Posted 6/21/09 on Myspace

Current mood: knighted (awesome Myspace emoticon unavailable)

We mastered it yesterday. Really excited for it to come out– it’s definitely the best thing we’ve done so far. I know every band always says that about their new record, even if their new record is indisputably awful. I mean, do you ever hear a band say “Just finished the new record. It’s not nearly as good as our old stuff. Kind of sucks, even. Catch us on tour”? Of course not.

But this time, we’re totally telling the truth.

Look for it this fall!

-Nate

Punknews 2009 Interview

Here’s an interview for Punknews from 2009. Check it out below, or on their site.

—-

With their inaugural release on Fat Wreck Chords, Collapser, available today, Nick and Nate from Minneapolis’ Banner Pilot spoke with Punknews’ Zack Zeigler regarding the differences betweenCollapser and their last release, Resignation Day, how comments – both positive and negative – from Punksnews’ readers can actually make a difference in the band and the steps Banner Pilot takes to ensure the production of their records don’t fall into the “mall-punk” category.

There are high hopes for your first Fat Wreck Chords’ release; did you feel the pressure during the writing or production of Collapser?

Nate: You know, not really. 99 percent of the writing took place before we signed, and the actual recording process was pretty laid back and fun. I feel like we really prepared for the recording and had everything written and ready to go, so there wasn’t a lot of pressure or stress. We knew we could play the songs and didn’t need to write a ton of parts on the fly or anything.

I guess the first couple days were a little stressful because we thought we’d be banging out four or five songs a day and that didn’t happen. But once we adjusted to the pace of a couple songs a day and accepted the fact that we’d have to book extra days, it was a blast.

It’s interesting though, I guess if we had signed *before* writing any of the songs it would have been a little different. I think there might have been more second-guessing going on while we were working on the songs. As it was, Fat had heard demos for 11 of the 12 songs before we even went into the studio, so there wasn’t the worry of handing the album in and them being like “Oh shit, we didn’t know that you guys totally suck.”

Sometimes punk music all sounds the same, so what will help separate Collapser from slipping into that category?

Nate: I think the fact that we distort our guitars and have gruff vocals should set us apart. Nah, I don’t know. In some ways I don’t think it’ll happen. I think, for example, that if you walked into a nursing home with a boombox and played Simple Plan and then Banner Pilot, you’d have a ton of old people yelling at you to turn it off, you’re waking up the dead, it all sounds the same, etc. You just have to do your best and hope that someone who is actually into punk music will notice any differences.

Nick: Yep – a guy I work with told me we sound just like the Offspring on numerous occasions. Who am I to argue? I usually just tell non-punk fans who ask that we sound kinda like the Ramones or Green Day.

Nate: Also, we definitely didn’t have an attitude of “we need to stand out and be different” with the record. That sort of mindset can lead to weird places where you’re forcing things – “Hey, let’s add…. a… flute?” – into your songs. You should just figure out what you can pull off and try to get really good at it.

Why is Banner Pilot getting popular? No disrespect in the question, but there are bands that never have or never will achieve the same success as you guys. So what makes your band different? Is it your work ethic? The personalities in the band? Do you all have the same goals? Or are you just that good?

Nick: How dare you, sir.

Nate: Well, this isn’t false modesty, but we’re really not that popular. To the extent that there’s some people out there who have heard our band and like it, I guess some of that might be because we do spend a fair amount of time on the songs. For every 50 song ideas I write on my computer at home, we’ll end up using five or six. And I think if we had the mindset of “the first twelve songs we come up with, there’s our album,” less people would like our band than do now.

There’s a line that punk rock fans sometimes obsess over when it comes to an album’s production. How do you guys decide if it’s too much or too little? Did you run into that at all with Collapser? Who – if anyone outside of the band – do you lean on for advice on that?

Nate: It’s definitely something we try to give a lot of attention to. Usually we start by playing the engineer records we like the sound of so they know off the bat what we’re shooting for. Then you kind of sit back a little and trust that the engineer knows what they’re doing, but still pipe up if it seems like something isn’t quite coming together. I think it worked – I’m really, really happy with how Collapser ended up sounding. I do think if we had pushed it too much further it would have bordered on over-produced, but as-is I really like where it’s at.

Of course, there’s also a difference between “really good” and “overproduced.” For example, none of the major label Green Day albums are overproduced; they’re all just really well-recorded. Whereas some of the mall-punk shit is comically overproduced. I like to think we wouldn’t ever end up with something that’s overproduced, even if we had some crazy budget, because none of us like how that shit sounds. I think other bands might aim for it. I mean, I’m guessing a band called something like Autumn’s Fall *wants* to sound like overproduced crap; we don’t, so it’s not that difficult to avoid, even if we had the means to accomplish it.

(Note: I have no idea if there is actually a band called Autumn’s Fall. But if there is, they must suck)

Nick: We definitely wanted to up the production for this record. I wasn’t really happy with the sound on Resignation Day – I kept thinking shit would improve dramatically in mastering but it didn’t work out that way – I came home with my copy and played it alongside songs by bands like the Copyrights and D4 and thought, “Fuck, this is too high-end.” Off With Their Heads’ From the Bottom sounded awesome, and that was recorded by Jacques Wait, who also had done Soviettes’ records (and Dear Landlord this spring). We asked him to record it and basically trusted him to make it sweet. I’m totally stoked on how it turned out.

Do you ever check out the comments on Punknews.org in response to any news about you guys? Do you even care?

Nate: Yeah, I definitely check out the comments; it’s fun to hear feedback on stuff. If someone doesn’t like something, and it’s useful criticism, I’ll keep it in mind for later. With the last album a fair amount of people said the songs sounded too similar, so when I was writing the basic ideas for the songs on this album I tried to force myself to try some new things. So getting that kind of feedback was useful.

On the other hand, if the criticism is “blows. new Thrice album fuckin’ owns this wussy girl music crap”, then…. I mean, that’s cool, you know? It’s worth a shrug or a grin and that’s about it. You’ll never have *everyone* liking something you do. And the other thing is, it’s just music. No one is going to be harmed by your record. If Banner Pilot, instead of making punk records, made pacemakers, I would be totally freaked out if people were like “ugh, these suck.”

Nick: I read the comments, but focus on those by posters with great musical taste like Scarysmurf, nocigar and 14theroad. I remember reading Dan Vapid say he never reads Methadones reviews, but I can’t help myself. Because of that, I’ve also seen such gems as “this CD was so wussy I gave it to my girlfriend” and “Banner Pilot would do better as a punk rock cover band.”

Is the goal as a band to stay the course, keep doing what you’re doing (because it seems to be working out well for you), or are you guys trying to find ways to explore new things?

Nate: One thing bands always run into is whether they should stick to what they know or try new things. Think about how often you see arcs like this:

1. Band X releases a well-received album. It introduces the “Band X Sound”

2. Band X releases a followup. It sounds basically like the first album but it’s not as good.

3. Stung by criticism that they’re a one trick pony, Band X releases a new album, saying “We want to expand our horizons and explore new sonic soundscapes. We don’t want to be restricted by tired old formulas. We’re breaking new ground. Keyboards are sweet now. Blah blah”. Their new album sounds totally different. It also sucks.

4. Band X says “We’re going back to basics. We don’t want to forget our roots. Longtime fans are in for some of the original fury that made Band X shatter preconceived notions of the human experience blah blah blah”

I mean, that happens all the time. So you have to try find the middle ground of not losing why people liked you in the first place, but also not falling into a rut. Finding that sweet spot is tough; not many bands pull it off.

I’d say that Jawbreaker and Against Me are great examples of pulling it off – each of their albums sounds different, but not in a forced way. And even though I like 24 Hour Revenge Therapy the most, I think I’d like Jawbreaker less if instead of releasing what they did, they just released four 24 Hour clones and Unfun/Bivouac/Dear You never existed. Superchunk and Sleater Kinney are two other examples of bands that pulled it off well.

Nick: I feel like we’re just getting better at we do, which is pop-punk, and I’m happy with that – that’s the music I love. On Collapser, we definitely did try to do some new stuff, more mid-tempo like “Starting at an Ending” and “Write it Down” which I was originally thinking could be acoustic when I wrote it. We may still try to cash in on the folk-punk wave though.

Sometimes, the better you become as a band, the more people like to try to tear you down. Is that happening to Banner Pilot? Is that from jealousy? Does that affect you?

Nate: Uh, I guess I haven’t noticed anyone trying to tear us down. Is that happening? Are there people out there trying to destroy us? I’m picturing some guy watching us through a monitor, stroking a cat and saying “Soon, my pretty.”

Nah, I dunno – I guess I haven’t really seen/heard that. If it’s people who are basically just like “We don’t like your band”, then who cares? I suppose something like what Against Me went through would bother me, but that’s not going to happen to a band of our size.

You’re playing The Fest this year. Any bands you want to see that you’ve never seen?

Nate: I need to sit down and go through all the bands on the website. Last year I did that and made a point of seeing as many new bands as possible. It was great. I stumbled on all sorts of great sets from bands I never knew of beforehand.

Nick: 7 Seconds! I played the shit out of The Crew back in high school. Other bands that I don’t see that often that I’ll make a point to check out include Bridge and Tunnel, Lemuria, Monikers, Dopamines, Menzingers and Toys that Kill.

Do you prefer playing festivals or shows? Are the short sets at festivals a positive or a negative draw for Banner Pilot? Or does it not matter as long as you’re playing to a crowd?

Nate: If it’s a fest against a single show, then I prefer a fest, no question. Tons of bands, including bands you don’t usually see live, a bunch of friends from across the country in one place… it’s great! If you’re comparing a fest to a tour, then you have plusses and minuses. Tours have more variety to them, and you have the bonus of being able to check out a new city each day.

But even then, I guess I prefer fests. They’re a lot of fun.

What’s wrong with a band that makes money? It seems, sometimes, that once a band starts to cash-in from their hard work – even without taking any short cuts – there are still ignorant fans that can’t wait to lump that band in with people who take the easy route. What’s up with that?

Nate: There’s nothing wrong with a band making money. Well, if it’s like “Hey, check out it out, Autumn’s Fall has teamed up with Vault soda to quench your thirst in a totally kickass way. Buy their new album Carbonate and get a coupon inside for free ringtones and a 20-oz. soda”, then it’s pretty fucking stupid. But in general, if you’re mad that a band has worked hard enough where they’re able to make some money off of what they do, then you are pretty stupid and spend your time getting worked up about ridiculous things.

Nick: Yep – in my opinion it just shouldn’t be what’s driving you. If you’re changing your music and image to make money, your shit isn’t from the heart and I don’t want to hear it. “Guys, my analysis shows that through the application of eye-liner we can boost sales by five percent” – Sorry, ya lost me.

Which three bands would you like to be mentioned in the same breath with? Which three would you consider an honor to be compared to when your career playing music is over?

Nate: Jawbreaker, Lawrence Arms, and Screeching Weasel would be cool. Those are all bands I’ve liked a lot over the years, and bands that I think kids will still be getting into for years to come.

Nick: Sounds right to me!

TruePunk 2009 Interview

Here’s an interview from TruePunk in 2009. Check it out below or on their site.

——-

Banner Pilot is a very young punk rock quartet from Minneapolis that formed in 2005. Their new album “Collapser” comes out on September 1st 2009 on Fat Wreck Chords. We sat down with Nate and asked him some question about his band and their upcoming projects.

What’s your name and what do you play in Banner Pilot?

Nate: My name is Mike Johnson (ed: ??? Weird typo on the website’s part. I did not forget my name!) On the record I play bass and lead guitar and live I play bass.

Your new album “Collapser” comes out Fat Wreck Chords on September 1st: how would you describe it to people who never heard of your band before?

Nate: Well, if I was describing it to someone who doesn’t listen to punk music I’d say it is fast music with loud guitars that sounds a little like Green Day. If the person looked at me in confusion after that, I’d say we sound sort of like Nickelback but better.

If I was describing it to someone who *does* listen to punk music, I’d say that we’re melodic punk rock similar to Jawbreaker or the Lawrence Arms. That’s probably enough for someone to have a decent feel for what we sound like.

You released a couple of albums before this new one. What changed in the approach of writing songs, if anything changed ?

Nate: The basic process has always been that #1, I write the guts of a song at home with a drum machine, then #2, Nick and me come up with vocal melodies over it, and then #3, we take that to the full band and flesh the song out. On the new record, there was less time spent on #1 and more time spent on #3. We were able to spend more time on the songs and have more input from everyone. It was fun to do and I think the end result is a little more varied and interesting.

How did you sign to Fat Wreck? Did you send a demo or did you receive a call from the label?

Nate: It was pretty straight-forward– we’ve always wanted to do a record with them so we sent a copy of some demos we’d been working on. They liked the songs, and that was about it.

Collapser” is filled with great pop punk melodies: what are your musical heroes?

Nate: Thanks! Well, I’m a pretty big fan of stuff like JawbreakerDillinger Four,Lawrence ArmsSuperchunkScreeching Weasel, and so on, and I think our tunes end up sounding similar to some of those bands.

You come from the Midwest punk scene: how is it? In which ways does it differ from the east and the west coast scenes?

Nate: I like it. It’s a good scene; there’s been definite ups and downs over the years but I think the current crop of bands and basements and labels are pretty great. I’ve never lived on the east or west coasts, so I guess I can’t really say how our scene compares to theirs. But probably, their scenes fucking suck and ours is totally awesome. Just kidding. I don’t really know. But I will say, Minneapolis feels kinda like a little city or maybe a gigantic medium sized town — if that makes sense — and I think that’s conducive to having a good scene. If you live in a huge city, it’s so spread out it’s probably hard to really have a “scene”, and if you live in a little town there might not be enough stuff going on to truly form a scene. So I think we kind of fall in the middle of that and it makes it easier to have a situation where you have a lot of different bands and a lot of different styles but it all feels at least a little bit connected

It looks like there are a lot of new bands coming out on No Idea and Fat Wreck that have great records: Dear LandlordOff With Their Heads,Banner PilotDillinger FourLawrence Arms, and so on. How do you think that these punks bands (you included) are making great records while older bands (as PennywiseLagwagonNo Use For A Name) are getting to sound a little bit old? Do you think kids are looking for something new, fresh and different these days?

Nate: Well, it’s probably just a simple difference in style I guess; the first set of bands you mention play a slightly different style of punk music than the second set of bands. So if you like that type of punk music you’ll probably be into those bands right now.

I didn’t really grow up listening to the other bands you mentioned — I was more into stuff like Screeching WeaselNOFX /RancidDead Kennedys / etc — and I’m honestly not that familiar with their stuff. But all of them have been around for 15-20 years so even if they’re still putting out awesome records, it’s pretty hard for them to be perceived as new or fresh, you know? I’m sure the OWTH and Dear Landlord and Lawrence Arms records of 2026 will be awesome but I doubt they’ll be viewed as, you know, “new” by anyone.

A lot of labels are making a hard work to promote their music, even lowering down CD prices: Fat sells cd’s for about 8 dollars, No Idea for about 7 dollars. What’s your position on the crisis of the music industry, mp3 piracy and record labels selling less and less records?

Nate: Well I think there’s good and bad to it, but mostly bad. The long term result of everyone grabbing albums for free will be less bands, less labels, less music, and what’s left will probably be of lesser quality. In an ideal world, an album would only be available for free download if that’s the way the band wanted it to be.

The good part is that if you’re a band your music will get around more now. And that’s pretty cool on an individual level, but on a large scale I think music piracy/illegal downloading/file sharing or whatever you want to call it does more harm than good for music.

How does a band like Banner Pilot survive in this chaotic world?

Nate: With album sales down, I think bands will have to start resorting more and more to weird things like endorsements and product placement if they want to make money off their band, but we’d never resort to something like that.

Hold on a second, I need to take a drink off of my delicious Mountain Dew so I can get the energy to be xtreme and finish this question. Ahhh. That really hit the spot. I hear that Mountain Dew is available in a store near you.

Anyway, we’ve certainly lost money on the band, but we’d be insane if we started a punk band to try to make money. It’s a fun thing to do– we write songs and hopefully people check them out and enjoy them. If at the end of the day we can break even that’s a nice bonus, but all it’s really about is playing music and having fun

You have a twitter account (twitter.com/bannerpilotband): is it helpful for a punk band to keep it? I have subscribed to some twitter accounts of some bands but what I mostly read is 140 letter bullshit.

Nate: It’s just a goofy, sorta fun thing. I don’t know if it’s really all that helpful necessarily but I suppose it’s a way for people who listen to your music to keep up on what you’re doing.

You’re right, though– most twitter accounts are just full of inane self-absorbed blather. Still, it’s entertaining to scroll through a bunch of updates a couple times a day and it can end up being a useful communication tool (like with the Iranian elections this year for example).

Speaking of tours, you will be playing at The Fest 8, and I will be there: what do you expect from this? Have you already played there? Which bands are you excited about? Any new band at The Fest that you might want to recommend to people, Banner Pilot aside?

Nate: This is our fourth year playing. It’s a blast! We’ve always had a great time and it’s one of the highlights of the year. I would recommend that people check out The Dopamines– great pop punk band who put on a super fun show. The bandGood Luckis also really fun live; they were probably my favorite set from Fest 7.

Will you tour Europe to support “Collapser“?

Nate: Definitely! I think we’re aiming to head over there in March or April. Not sure for how long or to which countries, but we’ll be over there!

Thanks a ton for your time! Your music is awesome!

Nate: Thanks man!

Studio Blog Days 5 through 11 or 12: The Lost Chronicles

Originally posted 5/17/09 on Myspace

Current mood:knighted (awesome Myspace emoticon unavailable)

Well, I sorta forgot about this, huh? Oh well! Here’s a brief rundown on what’s happened in the 6 or 7 studio days since the last update:

–All of the basic tracking is done. Drums, guitars, bass, leads, etc.

–Basic vocals for all 12 songs are done too, but i think we’re going to re-do one of them.

–We played probably 75 different crappy old-school video games on a modified Xbox. Stuff like baseball games from 1987, weird religious games, obscure stuff like Barbie and Day Dreamin’ Davey…. you name it. My level of nostalgia for the original NES system has been cut down by about 75% now.

–Ate some good food and some bad food. I didn’t partake but Danny and Corey went across the street to White Castle and attempted to order “one of every thing on your menu.” The employee was annoyed and didn’t quite give them everything (no Pulled Pork Sliders, no Clams, etc), but they returned a few minutes later with $13 worth of food, covering most of the menu. They even got something that would be OK for me (“here, it’s a bun with cheese, and we had them add a pickle”) but I took a pass. I believe someone said “It feels like I’m eating a bag of garbage” as they dined.

–Nearly destroyed my ears recording feedback for the intro to this one song. Small amps can get really loud when they’re cranked and you’re pointing a guitar at them.

More stuff happened than just that, but that’s a sufficient summary. We head back into the studio in a couple hours and then have a full day Monday and maybe a half day Wednesday. Hopefully that’ll cover what’s left (backup vocals, a few drum fixes, a bass solo I gotta re-do, etc), and then we’ll mix shortly after we get back from tour. We’re getting there, and it’s sounding pretty awesome!

-Nate

Studio Blog Day 4: Jason Takes Manhattan

Originally Posted 4/20/09 on Myspace

Current mood: breezy (awesome Myspace emoticon unavailable)

On day four we got two more songs done, started doing some vocals, and began picking away at guitar tracks. We’re getting there. We have to (like, Have To) do the basic tracking for three more songs on Day Five because that’s the last day we have booked for this first block. We’re back in next weekend for two days, maybe three, and then whatever else is still needed after that.

One of the two songs we finished up was the hardest one of the 12, so that’s nice to get that bad boy in the bag. One (1) drum part took about 90 minutes to record. Ack! Sounds pretty cool though. It’s this really complicated triangle solo. No, just kidding, it’s some kind of long snare roll buildup thing that I don’t really understand.

We also watched some badass metal videos on public access at about 2 in the morning and got inspired. The first Banner Pilot video will now feature:

–us playing in the woods. Spooky looking woods

–cuts that last no longer than one third of a second

–a sad and mysterious girl wearing a cloak and walking through the woods alone, occasionally staring into the camera

–liberal usage of the “lawnmower being run over gravel” vocal filter

and so on.

What else…. uh, the boxed wine i got was pretty good but the consensus from everyone else was that it was too “tart.”

I think that about covers it. Today, Day Five, will mostly be getting those last three songs tracked but hopefully we can knock out a couple more vocals too. And then we’re back in next Friday or Saturday to play all the leads, fix up all the rhythm guitars, and plug away at the vocals. It’ll start sounding like an album around that point. Should be fun!

-Nate

Studio Blog Day 3: Judgment Day

Originally Posted 4/20/09 on Myspace

Current mood: rockin (awesome Myspace emoticon unavailable)

Let’s see… day three saw the completion of four more songs (on drums, at least). Not bad. It’s not that we’re moving slower than expected (though we are), but that we’re spending more time on each thing than we thought we would. And that’s cool.

See, some of the stuff that’s being played over and over again won’t be noticed by anyone — no one is going to say “waaaaitaminute, the drummer hit that one snare hit slightly different that time,” or “damnit, the hi hat opened up for a second there, screw this album.” But, all those little things *add up* to a better listening experience. If we didn’t do all this stuff, you couldn’t pinpoint our mistakes but you’d think “Huh, this sounds kind of sloppy I guess.” It’s kind of like if someone took a quick leak (just, say, a dribble) in your large glass of apple juice without you knowing about it. You’re not going to necessarily go “Oh no! Urine!” and spit it out, but you’re going to sense that something’s up.

Essentially: right now we’re making sure the apple juice we’re brewing (is that how you make apple juice?) is free of urine.

I’m sure right now someone is going “Well, I like a little urine in my music,” which brings me to my next point: don’t worry, this isn’t going to be an overproduced album. We’re not going overboard on edits, not using auto tune, and mostly we’re not good enough musicians to pull that sort of thing off even if we wanted to.

So yeah: bottom line is that we’re taking our time and i’m pretty stoked about how stuff is sounding!

-Nate